Big Freedia talks about Beyoncé, pride month and LGBTQ+ rights

Big Freedia has lots of to celebrate this month of pride. It was revealed on Monday that the legendary New Orleans singer took part in another Beyoncé song (her first was “Formation”) for the renaissance singer’s latest dance anthem, “Break My Soul.” Featuring a sample from Freedia’s “Explode” and a renewed interest in house music, the anointed queen of Bounce feels especially grateful for the moment she has right now.

“I’m honored to be a part of this special moment and I’m incredibly grateful for all of God’s blessings.”

“It seems surreal to be back on the track with Beyoncé,” Fridia says. “I’m honored to be a part of this special moment and I’m incredibly grateful for all of God’s blessings.” Since the release of Break My Soul, fans have loved Fridia, especially for her contribution to the already iconic song. “Release your anger, free your mind / Free your work, free your time / Free your trading, free your stress / Release your love, forget the rest,” Fridia proclaims to Beyoncé.

The upbeat track comes just in time for Pride, who Freedia always honors as an open and proud queer artist. How does she acknowledge the month-long celebration of LGBTQ+ love, acceptance, and individual expression? “I travel around the cities of America (and the world) and, of course, I shake!” she said. “My Pride performances are incredible because so many fans have gathered to celebrate the same thing. The energy is truly breathtaking!”

To kick off Pride Month, Fridia joined over 150 LGBTQ+ stars and influencers, including Raven Simone, Hayley Kiyoko, and RuPaul’s Drag Race alum Eureka O’Hara, for the first ever nationwide Pride Eve celebration led by Invis.tv.

“Pride and Pride Eve means remembering those who sacrificed themselves to change laws and open doors to the LGBTQ+ community.”

According to Invisible Narratives co-president Katherine McAvoy, the company’s Pride Eve event was set up in just 60 days and the response from stars like Fridia who wanted to attend was greater than they expected. “[Our team] called and everyone was just spreading the word,” says McAvoy. initiative”.

“Anything I can do to get people interested in Pride, I’m ready,” Fridia says. “Pride and Pride Eve stands for the memory of those who sacrificed themselves to change laws and open doors to the LGBTQ+ community. This is a time to celebrate and acknowledge the contributions and progress we have made.”

At a time when LGBTQ+ rights are under threat from violence across America and states are limiting trans youth’s access to gender-affirming health care, Freedia notes that young people still give her hope that everything can change to better. “All over the world, I see them stepping up to make a difference,” she says. “I know the news is disturbing, but we can’t let it get to us. I know people on the ground who are demanding change.”

For those who want to help protect the rights of people in the LGBTQ+ community, Freedia offers many organizations to look into, such as GLAAD, Trevor Project, Black AIDS Instituteand National Center for Transgender Equality — has already started work. “[There are] so many ways to get involved,” she says. “Start in your city.”

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