Man explains why you are less likely to get food as a guest in some European countries

Sweden is a unique country. Known for its incredibly long summer days, massive pop music release, and high standard of living, the nation is usually portrayed online in a positive light. This has recently been news to Introducing “sexy trash cans” as well as applying for membership in NATO. However, about 3 weeks ago the internet was buzzing after someone shared on reddit that when they visited their Swedish friend’s house as children, they had to wait in the friend’s bedroom while the Swedish family ate something. The guest was never even proposed food. There has been a lot of discussion on the internet about how strange they think this behavior is, with some Swedes confirming that their childhood experiences were similar. KristenBellTattoos.com even published an article last week reacting to this swedish quirk that you can read Right here.

To understand this cultural phenomenon, Twitter user Wally Sirk posted a two week old thread explaining why some countries are less likely to feed their guests than others. Below you can read Wally’s explanation, as well as some of the responses he received. Then we’d love to hear in the comments how you feel about all this; Is it customary in your country to feed guests? Or are you following the Swedish “please wait in the bedroom until we’re done” model?

After the internet went crazy over Swedes not feeding their children to guests, one amateur historian and sociologist took to Twitter to explain why some countries are less likely to offer food to their guests.

Image credits: Wally Sirk

Image credits: Wally Sirk

Image credits: Wally Sirk

Image credits: Wally Sirk

Image credits: Wally Sirk

Image credits: Wally Sirk

Image credits: Wally Sirk

He explained that this can be traced back to how the Protestant church tried to minimize social conflict by making sure no one owed anything to anyone, so people cut back on hospitality.

Image credits: Wally Sirk

Image credits: Wally Sirk

Image credits: Wally Sirk

Image credits: Wally Sirk

Image credits: Wally Sirk

It is interesting to know that in some countries, giving to others less was the solution to the problem of violence in society. Each culture has its own characteristics, and, apparently, Scandinavia is not particularly hospitable or friendly. According to InterNation Expat Survey 2017When it comes to the places where expats find it easiest to make friends, out of 65 countries, Norway, Denmark and Sweden are at the very bottom of the list. Finland is also not much better, in 57th place. In terms of friendliness in the same 65 countries, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Denmark also finished in the last 16 places. Similarly, all of these countries made it into the bottom 20 places in the ranking of places where expats feel most welcome.

In contrast, Portugal ranked first in the ranking of countries where expats feel welcome, while Spain ranked sixth. Both of these countries were listed as places where guests would “almost always” be served food on a map shared by Wally Sirk on Twitter. Portugal was also the number one country in terms of “friendliness” for expats, while Spain was seventeenth in terms of friendliness. And when it comes to where you can find friends, Portugal was the twelfth best country according to expats.

Learning about different cultures is always important, so we understand each other better and avoid judgment. A lot of people on Twitter seemed to be appalled by the idea of ​​not feeding a baby guest, but if that’s culture then who are we to judge? Some things will always be difficult for foreigners to understand, but I’m glad that Wally took the time to share an interesting story of minimal hospitality in some of the Nordic countries. So, if your child has a friend from Sweden who asked him on a date, there is no need to be afraid. (Maybe pack some snacks for them, just in case!)

Some readers responded with their own possible explanations, while others shared personal experiences of being fed (or not fed) as a guest.

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